Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale
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The New York Times bestselling memoir about identity, love and understanding. Now a major motion picture starring Nicole Kidman, Russell Crowe, and Lucas Hedges, directed by Joel Edgerton. “Every sentence of the story will stir your soul” (O Magazine).
 
The son of a Baptist pastor and deeply embedded in church life in small town Arkansas, as a young man Garrard Conley was terrified and conflicted about his sexuality. When Garrard was a nineteen-year-old college student, he was outed to his parents, and was forced to make a life-changing decision: either agree to attend a church-supported conversion therapy program that promised to "cure" him of homosexuality; or risk losing family, friends, and the God he had prayed to every day of his life. Through an institutionalized Twelve-Step Program heavy on Bible study, he was supposed to emerge heterosexual, ex-gay, cleansed of impure urges and stronger in his faith in God for his brush with sin. Instead, even when faced with a harrowing and brutal journey, Garrard found the strength and understanding to break out in search of his true self and forgiveness.

By confronting his buried past and the burden of a life lived in shadow, Garrard traces the complex relationships among family, faith, and community. At times heart-breaking, at times triumphant, Boy Erased is a testament to love that survives despite all odds.

Review

"[A] powerful convergence of events that Conley portrays eloquently."  —Washington Post

"The power of Conley’s story resides not only in the vividly depicted grotesqueries of the therapy system, but in his lyrical writing about sexuality and love, and his reflections on the Southern family and culture that shaped him."  —Los Angeles Times

“This brave and bracing memoir is an urgent reminder that America remains a place where queer people have to fight for their lives. It’s also a generous portrait of a family in which the myths of prejudice give way before the reality of love. Equal parts sympathy and rage,  Boy Erased is a necessary, beautiful book.” — Garth Greenwell, author of  What Belongs to You

"A brave, powerful meditation on identity and faith,  Boy Erased is the story of one man’s journey to accepting himself and overcoming shame and trauma in the midst of deep-rooted bigotry."  —Buzzfeed (Buzzfeed''s Hot Summer Reads)

"A moving memoir about discovering your true self,  Boy Erased is a must-read."  —Bustle

Boy Erased is a gut-punch of a memoir, but the miracle of this book is the generosity with which Conley writes in an effort to understand the circumstances and motivations that led his family to seek the “cure”… his memoir is not simply a story of survival — in this book, a true writer comes of age. Conley writes vividly, with intelligence, wit, and genuine empathy. By embracing complexity and compassion, he reclaims his life and reminds us that a story rarely belongs to one person alone.” —LA Review of Books

“Well-written, compelling, disturbing, and ultimately quite bracing, this is an important, refreshingly unsentimental perspective on the dangers and abuses of ex-gay therapy ministries.”   —Bay Area Reporter

“Wrenching and absorbing.” —Travel and Leisure
 
“A compelling story of perseverance and humanity.” —Outsmart Magazine

Boy Erased isn’t a smug tale of liberal awakening: Conley is frank and articulate about the sense of loss that has come with denying his religion and, as a consequence, the family he still loves…[Conley’s] writerly eye often wanders outside non-fiction’s usual constraints. Writing stories is the work he wants to do; this book is clearly the work he needed to do.” — Toronto Star

"Exceptionally well-written... This timely addition to the debate on conversion therapy will build sympathy for both children and parents who avail themselves of it while still showing how damaging it can be." — Publishers Weekly, STARRED review

“In a sharp and shocking debut memoir, Conley digs deep into the ex-gay therapy system… An engaging memoir that will inevitably make readers long for a more equal future.” — Kirkus Reviews
 
“Closely observed feelings are the fuel that drives this complex coming-of-age account… Moving and thought provoking.”  —Booklist

"An essential document of the early 21st Century. Conley bears witness to something history will eventually condemn as too horrible to have happened, but he also takes the pain of "ex-gay therapy" and makes of it not just a record but a wonder."
Alexander Chee, author of The Queen of the Night 

“A brave account of a young man coming to terms with his sexuality in an environment that reviles him for it. A triumphant, heartfelt story.” — Julia Scheeres, New York Times–bestselling author of Jesus Land and A Thousand Lives

"Garrard Conley has a hell of story to tell, but he tells it with complete intelligence and gravity and beauty.  This is a book that matters on every level, from the most intimate to the most political, and it settles into the reader''s memory perfectly and permanently. Boy Erased is the book for our times — an important book, and a true companion." — Rebecca Lee, author of Bobcat and Other Stories
 
“Conley tells his story beautifully, with candor and courage and with compassion not only for the boy he was but for the parents who sent him to ex-gay therapy. Here at last is a story of evangelical homophobia from the inside, from a survivor and former believer, rather than from the incredulous outside. A vital book for young people still struggling with self-hatred inside the church and for anyone who’s escaped it.” — Maud Newton
 
“Garrard Conley’s memoir about his time in the ex-gay movement is actually about surviving an attempt at soul-murder. This is a book that had to be written, and it deserves a wide audience.” — Charles Baxter, author of The Feast of Love
 
“In 1982, Edmund White broke literary ground with his memoir A. Now it’s Garrard Conley’s turn to bring his own story to readers. As White was three decades ago for his generation, Conley is an important and necessary contemporary voice.” — Ann Hood, author of The Knitting Circle and Comfort

About the Author

Garrard Conley is the author of the New York Times bestselling memoir  Boy Erased, which has been translated in over a dozen languages and is now a major motion picture.

Conley is also a creator and producer of the podcast UnErased, which explores the history of conversion therapy in America through interviews, historical documents, and archival materials provided by the Mattachine Society of Washington, D.C.

His work can be found in  The New York Times, TIMEVICECNNBuzzFeedThemVirginia Quarterly Review, and  The Huffington Post, among other places. Conley lives in New York City with his husband, and is currently at work on a novel about queer 18th century lives. He can be found online @gayrodcon and garrardconley.com.

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4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Juan de Zengotita
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A powerful story
Reviewed in the United States on April 15, 2018
It would be easy for this book to have taken on a very different tone. Garrard Conley’s time with the ex-gay conversion group seems the sort of thing which could enrage you, once you come out of the mental chaos this pseudo-science pastiche of self-help jargon, addiction... See more
It would be easy for this book to have taken on a very different tone. Garrard Conley’s time with the ex-gay conversion group seems the sort of thing which could enrage you, once you come out of the mental chaos this pseudo-science pastiche of self-help jargon, addiction methodology and fringe (at least today, and for most people) fundamentalist beliefs. It could have been, arguably legitimately, full of bitterness, reproach, and mocking derision of the people engaged in this effort to reverse what most of us know feel (know) to be foundational qualities of each human being: who can provide romantic, spiritual, mental and sexual completion to us. Or more simply, who we love. But there is a quality to this book, perhaps a humility which comes from still loving the people he grew up with, the values they instilled, the faith that he had. He sums it up at one point by saying “it’s complicated.” I might say in addition, he shows it can be nuanced. You can love a person, but disagree with them. You can value a religion, but not all of it. You can condemn what a person does, but still see there is humanity in there, however deep. You can do this, but still hold on to and advance stronger beliefs: hypocrisy has no role in important conversations. We have rights, like being who are, being free to think for ourselves, to seek knowledge, and engage in debates about it. The events in this book range from a lifetime to less than two weeks of conversion therapy. I felt I understood his well intentioned attempt to try this, to respect his upbringing and his family, and how the attempt almost derailed his life. His mother’s presence is captured as a depiction of how parental love can both push a person toward what one thinks is right, but when seeing things hurt their child, rise up to defend them; his father’s similarly, how one can work to form a child, give them the knowledge and ability to prosper in life, but also to realize that if isn’t what they need, to accept that. I hope Garrard is able to make a happy life for himself, and kind of feel he will. I hope this book can help people who have experienced, as I have (not to his extent) the challenge of being gay in the gap between the generational change we have seen in our lifetimes. And in a way, by how he maintains love and respect for the people in his life who were unable to accept his homosexuality, help bring understanding between people who would instead be condemning each other as bigots or blasphemers. It is so much better to be in communication than to be right.
74 people found this helpful
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Lori Palmer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disconnected
Reviewed in the United States on October 27, 2018
I understand that writing can be therapeutic, and I am sympathetic with the writer. I don''t think anyone should have to go through what he did. I just didn''t think there was a logical flow to the writing itself. It was difficult to follow with how much it jumped around. I... See more
I understand that writing can be therapeutic, and I am sympathetic with the writer. I don''t think anyone should have to go through what he did. I just didn''t think there was a logical flow to the writing itself. It was difficult to follow with how much it jumped around. I don''t think everything that happened at LIA could have been told. I honesty didn''t get what happened that made him feel suicidal. This is what leads me to believe that something was left out. Maybe the most painful experiences have been blocked out of the writer''s memory, or weren''t able to be shared because of a contract signed with LIA, I''m not sure. I was just never able to connect with the authors pain because of the constant jumping around or lack of experience shared or possibly both. I just had a difficult time pushing through this book.
52 people found this helpful
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David Bradford
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Boy Erased
Reviewed in the United States on June 16, 2018
This is powerful writing. I could not put it down. The author''s account of his time in the ex-gay "therapy group" is profoundly moving - as the days pass and the author reveals his increasing stubborn resistance to what the counsellors are trying to do to him I felt... See more
This is powerful writing. I could not put it down. The author''s account of his time in the ex-gay "therapy group" is profoundly moving - as the days pass and the author reveals his increasing stubborn resistance to what the counsellors are trying to do to him I felt like cheering him on. Thank God I never had to undergo such a truly painful experience - at 76 now - when I faced my own struggle between the fundamentalist Baptist faith I was raised in and my own homosexuality the ex-gay movement didn''t exist in Australia. But I share the author''s pain when inevitably by accepting one''s own sexuality one cannot help but wound the God-fearing parents one truly loves. Yes indeed, Gerrard, it''s complicated. And the angst never truly passes completely. This account is the very best I have ever read of such a personal story. I thank the author for writing it and urge people who want or need to understand this issue to read it.
39 people found this helpful
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J. Nelson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Haunting, beautiful prose
Reviewed in the United States on July 20, 2018
For every "Boy Erased" there is a "Simon vs. the Homo-Sapiens Agenda" or a "Call Me By Your Name".. Unfortunately, the latter two are fiction, while Garrard Conley''s memoir is an unfortunate, if beautiful, reminder of the uphill battle many LGBTQIA+... See more
For every "Boy Erased" there is a "Simon vs. the Homo-Sapiens Agenda" or a "Call Me By Your Name".. Unfortunately, the latter two are fiction, while Garrard Conley''s memoir is an unfortunate, if beautiful, reminder of the uphill battle many LGBTQIA+ Americans still face not only from society at large, but from those who should be most able to love and support them unconditionally: their families.

In between vivid and searing passages describing his experience with the pseudo-psychology and half-baked Freudian analysis of Love In Action''s conversion therapy, Conley includes beautiful, lyrical flashbacks to provide not only context for his decision to voluntarily enter therapy, but also to demonstrate his deep love for his parents and his willingness to put himself through hell and back for them. Many of these scenes had an extremely uncomfortable resonance with me, having also grown up in a Southern Baptist congregation. Perhaps the most illuminating scene in the novel is the event that causes Conley to walk out of Love In Action: when a counselor tries to force him to admit that he hates his father- the evangelical preacher who delivered to him an ultimatum: choose between conversion therapy or be disowned- he is unable to summon any anger for his parents. Through everything, he loves his family.

Despite all of the anguish inflicted on the author, he has managed to deliver a tale that is at turns haunting and touching, yet somehow without vitriol, even though there is plenty of potential anger and blame to spread around to his parents, to his church and community, to Love In Action and Exodus International, or to society at large. Instead, his narrative ends with his mother, realizing the damage being done to her son, removes him from therapy. The lack of condemnation and or reciprocal hate in Conley''s narrative is at once refreshing and disappointing. Were this not a true story, the lack of conflict at the end would seem unsatisfying... But as a recounting of actual events, the lack of anger and hate is refreshing.
34 people found this helpful
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Ris
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Should have seen the movie instead!
Reviewed in the United States on December 22, 2018
Heard the movie was quite good so decided to read the book first as books are usually better. Must not be so in this case. It is an interesting story line but much too wordy and drawn out. There are many vivid descriptions of things that really add nothing to the story.... See more
Heard the movie was quite good so decided to read the book first as books are usually better. Must not be so in this case. It is an interesting story line but much too wordy and drawn out. There are many vivid descriptions of things that really add nothing to the story. I managed to push through 3/4 of the book and finally had to give up - it was painful to get that far. Finally erased it from my kindle to stop torturing myself.
22 people found this helpful
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Grace Collins
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Mixed Bag
Reviewed in the United States on January 4, 2017
I will be the first to admit that Garrard Conley is a fantastic writer who does a wonderful job of setting the scenes in this work. However, I would also like to say that I have read dozens of memoirs by Holocaust survivors, the children of rapists and drug dealers, and... See more
I will be the first to admit that Garrard Conley is a fantastic writer who does a wonderful job of setting the scenes in this work. However, I would also like to say that I have read dozens of memoirs by Holocaust survivors, the children of rapists and drug dealers, and people who have been kidnapped and tortured for years (such as Jaycee Dugard''s memoir), and this is probably the least optimistic one that I have ever read.
Conley has endured some horrible experiences that he describes in heartbreaking detail throughout this book, but his insights feel lacking at times. Conley is extremely adept at describing the nature and intensity of his pain, but fails to put his experience together, connecting it to his current self and adult worldview. Throughout the book, he rejects offers of help and support from individuals from his family doctors to his two closest friends at college, and seems determined to believe that the entire world has abandoned him. Garrard primarily focuses on how deeply he was traumatized by this therapy and his parents'' decision to enroll in it, even though he agreed to the therapy and his mother removed him from the program out of concern when he was still on step one of twelve.
The gist of Conley''s memoir seems to be that his very short time in ex-gay conversion therapy has erased him, perhaps in ways that can''t be repaired. As another reviewer remarked, it would probably be more interesting to read Conley''s reflections on the experience a few decades from now, as it seems that he has not yet been able to fully process or move past the experience in any respect.
Despite all that, Conley is a fantastic writer with obvious talent, and his story is, without question, worth telling. However, I think the book would have benefitted from some time and distance to give the author a clearer perspective on the long-term effects of the experience, and how he has rebuilt his life following his trauma.
51 people found this helpful
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Daniel L. Driewer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Powerful, painful......
Reviewed in the United States on September 3, 2018
I''m gay. It took me 5 decades to accept it. In the process, I lost my family. This book was too real for me at times - what might have been my fate had I traveled a different path than I did. It tells the tale of a young gay man when he was 17-19 years old. The author... See more
I''m gay. It took me 5 decades to accept it. In the process, I lost my family. This book was too real for me at times - what might have been my fate had I traveled a different path than I did. It tells the tale of a young gay man when he was 17-19 years old. The author hails from the Ozarks. Bible Belt area. His family is very religious, fundamentalist Baptists. The father, owned and ran a generational cotton gin business, then had an interest in a car dealership, where the boy worked, until he hears a calling from God. His dad decides to become an ordained Baptist minister. What I''m trying to say is conditions, even in the early 2000, were not optimal for this gay son/young man.

Garrard, the author, has a girlfriend in HS. She''s from his church and everyone approves including the parents. Being gay (and I know this from experience) the last thing he wants is an intimate relationship with her. When the girl starts to make the moves sexually........he backs off and ends it. This is right before college, which the parents are paying for.

We''re told that the Garrard was same sex attracted from an early age with his first "crush" being a male teacher. As many gay boys/men seem to be, he longs to be normal, straight or "not gay", not different. At college he tried to shy away from gay related activities but deep down he has desires, fantasies, etc. He''s a normal gay young man. Garrard befriends another boy who takes him to a Pentecostal church. The relationship is just budding when this "friend" literally rapes him. No consensual sex, no foreplay - rape. To make it all the worse, the rapist "outs" him to his parents. Garrand is traumatized doubly over, his parents beside themselves given their beliefs to learn their only child, their son is gay.

The rest for the book covers "Love in Action" an offshoot of "Exodus International" a now debunked and disreputable organization and their theory(s) that gays can be "cured" of their same sex attraction. No F-ing way can this be done. I know from personal experience. You are what you are for whatever reason: DNA, life experiences, chromosomes, mothers pregnancy, whatever. My belief is God made me this way for whatever reason. Why? I hope to be able to ask Him some day.

The strain on this young mans life was enormous. His father threatened to yank his only child''s/son''s college and home away from him. Everything for this young man was at stake. I won''t go into details of the therapy.....but it''s depressing and, from my perspective, outrageous among other things I could say.

Bottom line, no happy ending but there was some light at the end of the tunnel. When pushed against the wall at one therapy session Garrard has had enough, starts walking and never looks back. Gets his phone and calls his one and only ally in this sordid story: his mother. Garrard finishes college. Semi reconciles with his family......dad? Not so much. There''s still love there however. What is finished right now or at the time of the book''s writing anyway is that Garrard is done with God, done with religion - any religion.

I''m glad I read the book. I learned quite about about one man''s struggle with being outed and his own personal battle complete with reparative therapy. I was also glad to be finished with it because it hit too close to home for me - made me anxious, upset and depressed.

Bottom line, I''d recommend this book highly, especially if your gay, know someone who is or support gay rights and the fact that we are just people, who happen, through no fault of our own, to be attracted to the same sex.
10 people found this helpful
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Franklin the Mouse
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Living In Gay Limbo
Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2018
We are all products of our environments. I was raised in a predominately Catholic small town in northern Maine. It took some effort for me to resolve my questions about faith and ultimately become agnostic. Mr. Conley''s ordeal is immensely more challenging. He grew up in a... See more
We are all products of our environments. I was raised in a predominately Catholic small town in northern Maine. It took some effort for me to resolve my questions about faith and ultimately become agnostic. Mr. Conley''s ordeal is immensely more challenging. He grew up in a loving family as an only child, but the community and state, for that matter, were God-fearing evangelicals and, to top it all off, his dad during his fifties became a Baptist minister. In my town, religion was taken seriously, but, my word, the author''s Southern community makes us Catholic Mainers appear like layabouts in the faith department. Until the age of eighteen, the author attended church three times a week and tried to absorb a literal interpretation of the Bible. Their requirement to try saving souls by witnessing to strangers may be a common thing in the South but it''s also a nice way to cause a northern Yankee to flip you the bird. For Mr. Conley to struggle very early on in his life with his attraction towards males and being programmed to view it as not only sinful but a sure-fire ticket to Hell was to live a life of near-constant fear, pain, and confusion. What makes the author''s book such an exceptional work is his ability to convey his internal struggles and efforts to "cure" himself of a very natural condition.

The memoir does address his short stay at a misguided gay-conversion therapy institution during the summer of 2004 but the book, at its core, is his relationship with his family, community, faith, and sexuality. He was nineteen years old when Mr. Conley voluntarily admitted himself into Love in Action to try ridding him of his gayness. He wouldn''t have walked into the place if it were not for his upbringing as well as the social and family pressures to do it. The author portrays the people who inhabit his memoir as good people. However, the evangelicals'' approach to viewing homosexuality as a mental problem is silly. It''s wishful thinking on their part. Science has shown that homosexuality is innate in an estimated two-to-three percent of the population. You''d have a better chance of converting rabbit scat into M&Ms than removing the gay out of someone. Love in Action''s "rehabilitation" program methods and rules are, well, nothing short of loony and similar to cult indoctrination methods of smaller sects. These so-called instructors may have been sincere in their objectives, but they were doing much more harm than good.

''Boy Erased'' does a wonderful job of explaining the Southern evangelical mindset and the social pressures to conform. It takes immense courage to buck against your tribe''s groupthink. Fortunately, Mr. Conley''s exposure to other people and beliefs at college opened his eyes to more critical thinking skills and, ultimately, emancipation. What happens to Love in Action''s leader, John Smid, is priceless irony. Despite the memoir being an empathetic piece for all involved, it does end on a down note. The author''s epilogue explains him reaching out to other victims of gay-conversion therapy and the lasting scars it has left on many in the gay community. Mr. Conley states in his summary, "... (it reveals) decades of pain, decades lost, families torn apart, relationships ruined because people outside the gay world can never understand what we patients went through." The author has done an outstanding job of helping heterosexuals such as myself to understand. Thank you, Mr. Conley.
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Top reviews from other countries

Wesfan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An excellent read. What a brave young man to have ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 29, 2018
An excellent read. What a brave young man to have stood up against this outrageous belief that you can be cured of homosexuality. I wasted many hours over many years pleading with God for healing and freedom from this curse. My freedom came when I began to see that my...See more
An excellent read. What a brave young man to have stood up against this outrageous belief that you can be cured of homosexuality. I wasted many hours over many years pleading with God for healing and freedom from this curse. My freedom came when I began to see that my sexuality was a gift from God. My healing took place as I began to thank God for who I was and accepted that God can (and has) used me and blessed me just as I am.
15 people found this helpful
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Roger
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just did not deliver
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 27, 2018
As a man who is gay and having grown up in a rather strict Christian denomination (if it was, it was sinful seemed to be a basic premise) I am not sure what the author was trying to achieve with this book, but it left me underwhelmed and unmoved. Was it meant to be a...See more
As a man who is gay and having grown up in a rather strict Christian denomination (if it was, it was sinful seemed to be a basic premise) I am not sure what the author was trying to achieve with this book, but it left me underwhelmed and unmoved. Was it meant to be a timeline? In which case it became very confusing with far too many rambling sidetracks and backtracks. Was it meant to be an expose of ex-gay ministries? I would have thought that had been well enough documented by now. Was it meant to be a literary novel? Parts of it were certainly obscure enough. I found myself incresingly skip-reading it I am afraid. Sorry I can''t be more positive about it.
6 people found this helpful
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LJBentley
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very honest
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 22, 2019
Last year, I saw Garrard Conley give an interview on British television. His story was so compelling that is almost didn’t seem true. Alas, it was. No, it is. The stories of camps where a person can go to ‘pray away the gay’ are becoming more and more familiar. They are...See more
Last year, I saw Garrard Conley give an interview on British television. His story was so compelling that is almost didn’t seem true. Alas, it was. No, it is. The stories of camps where a person can go to ‘pray away the gay’ are becoming more and more familiar. They are being discussed in YA fiction, movies and sadly, they really exist. Garrard Conley does not spare any of the details of how he came to attend the camp in his memoir Boy Erased, how he felt guilty for being gay, how he felt he needed to be cured. Due to his deep set religious beliefs, he was made – and to some extent, made himself – feel wrong. This is an amazing and challenging memoir that throws you right into the fray from page one. You feel uncomfortable and you get a real sense of going through what Conley went through. It is brutally honest and, at times, very hard to read but it is definitely a memoir to add to your reading list. Boy Erased by Garrard Conley is available now.
2 people found this helpful
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ANELEH
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Meaning lost through bad writing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 12, 2019
I really, really wanted to like this book. There is absolutely no doubt that it has an important place in helping society to understand how gay people are mistreated and misunderstood. However, it is so badly written that I lost interest. It is disjointed, there is no flow...See more
I really, really wanted to like this book. There is absolutely no doubt that it has an important place in helping society to understand how gay people are mistreated and misunderstood. However, it is so badly written that I lost interest. It is disjointed, there is no flow and it doesn''t build any sort of momentum. I''m really sad that I''ve given up reading this book. It''s still in my bag so I might pick it up again if I am bored but I am certainly in no rush to go back to it
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Em Yarnell
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting book but I didn''t finish it. sorry.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 8, 2019
Okay so this book peaked my interest and I enjoyed the section of it I did read. I didn''t quite make 50%. The truth is that I don''t normally stop reading books, because I hate to not finish them and know the whole story. The issue that I had with this book was that it felt...See more
Okay so this book peaked my interest and I enjoyed the section of it I did read. I didn''t quite make 50%. The truth is that I don''t normally stop reading books, because I hate to not finish them and know the whole story. The issue that I had with this book was that it felt completely devoid of emotion and it was making me angry reading about the forced suppression and what I would call torture of humans at the hands of people who are supposed to support and protect you. I think that perhaps in the future I may come back to it. I can see that it is an interesting story and I hope one day to be able to finish it. Unfortunately now is not the right time for me.
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Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale

Boy lowest Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, 2021 and Family online sale